spectrumsid
art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier
There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 
A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.
The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.
Anatomy of the Blade
The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.
Tang
At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.
Ricasso
The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.
Blade
The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.
Edge
The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).
Point
The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.
Strong
The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.
Weak
The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.
Anatomy of the Guard
The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.
Pommel
A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.
Turk’s Head
A spacer between the counter weight and handle.
Handle
The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.
Crossbar Block
The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.
Crossbar
The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.
Sweepings
The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.
Knuckle Guard
Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.
Cup
The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier

There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 

A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.

The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.

  • Anatomy of the Blade

The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.

  • Tang

At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.

  • Ricasso

The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.

  • Blade

The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.

  • Edge

The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).

  • Point

The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.

  • Strong

The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.

  • Weak

The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.

  • Anatomy of the Guard

The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.

  • Pommel

A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.

  • Turk’s Head

A spacer between the counter weight and handle.

  • Handle

The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.

  • Crossbar Block

The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.

  • Crossbar

The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.

  • Sweepings

The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.

  • Knuckle Guard

Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.

  • Cup

The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

spectrumsid

samurottedge:

Since it was Munday, I decided to do a small art reference project for myself. And then I decided to make it public with the following notes.

From Left to Right, Top to Bottom:

What NOT to do (front):

  • Don’t chicken wing your arms! Although it might be easier to hold the rifle, you will make yourself a bigger target.
  • Don’t close your one eye! You will lose your depth perception, which is crucial when you are on the move, or are trying to determine how far away your target is
  • Don’t keep your legs haphazardly strewn about. You need to make sure you’re balanced!

What to do (front)

  • Keep both eyes open
  • Bend your elbows downwards and towards the ground to make yourself a smaller target
  • Bend your knees to control the gun’s recoil + be ready to move.

What NOT to do (side)

  • Don’t put the stock above your shoulder
  • Don’t lean back.
  • Both of the above reduce your control over the weapon and may result in a black eye, and the rifle flying backwards and out of your hands.

What to do (side)

  • Bury the stock of the rifle into the meaty part of your shoulder
  • Lean into the gun to keep the gun under control when the recoil of the gun kicks the gun upwards or to the side
  • Bend your knees slightly to lean forward, as well as make yourself a smaller target

Patrol/Relaxed Stance

  • The soldier is relaxed and is most likely moving around.
  • His eyes are searching for possible threats
  • His hands are still on the rifle, even if he has a sling on

Low Ready Stance

  • Possible threat has been detected
  • Entire body shifts towards threat direction
  • Stock is shouldered 
  • Eyes are focused on the possible target
  • Gun barrel is pointed in the target’s general direction, but not directly at the target.

Firing Stance

  • Immediate response
  • Soldier fires off shots while screaming to the other people in his team
  • "CONTACT!" or "THREAT!"
peachpae

Words to describe someone's voice

  • adenoidal: if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
  • appealing: an appealing look, voice etc shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
  • breathy: with loud breathing noises
  • brittle: if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
  • croaky: if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
  • dead: if someone’s eyes are dead, or if their voice is dead, they feel or show no emotion
  • disembodied: a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat: spoken in a voice that does not go up and down. This word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region.
  • fruity: a fruity voice or laugh is deep and strong in a pleasant way
  • grating: a grating voice, laugh, or sound is unpleasant and annoying
  • gravelly: a gravelly voice sounds low and rough
  • gruff: a gruff voice has a rough low sound
  • guttural: a guttural sound is deep and made at the back of your throat
  • high-pitched: a high-pitched voice or sound is very high
  • hoarse: someone who is hoarse or has a hoarse voice speaks in a low rough voice, usually because their throat is sore
  • honeyed: honeyed words or a honeyed voice sound very nice but you cannot trust the person who is speaking
  • husky: a husky voice is deep and sounds hoarse (=as if you have a sore throat), often in an attractive way
  • low adjective: a low voice or sound is quiet and difficult to hear
  • low adverb: in a deep voice, or with a deep sound
  • matter-of-fact: used about someone’s behaviour or voice
  • modulated: a modulated voice is controlled and pleasant to listen to
  • monotonous: a monotonous sound or voice is boring and unpleasant because it does not change in loudness or become higher or lower
  • nasal: someone with a nasal voice sounds as if they are speaking through their nose
  • orotund: an orotund voice is loud and clear
  • penetrating: a penetrating voice or sound is so high or loud that it makes you slightly uncomfortable
  • plummy: a plummy voice or way of speaking is considered to be typical of an English person of a high social class. This word shows that you dislike people who speak like this.
  • quietly: in a quiet voice
  • raucous: a raucous voice or noise is loud and sounds rough
  • ringing: a ringing sound or voice is very loud and clear
  • rough: a rough voice is not soft and is unpleasant to listen to
  • shrill: a shrill noise or voice is very loud, high, and unpleasant
  • silvery: a silvery voice or sound is clear, light, and pleasant
  • singsong: if you speak in a singsong voice, your voice rises and falls in a musical way
  • small: a small voice or sound is quiet
  • smoky: a smoky voice or smoky eyes are sexually attractive in a slightly mysterious way
  • softly spoken: someone who is softly spoken has a quiet gentle voice
  • sotto voce adjective, adverb: in a very quiet voice
  • stentorian: a stentorian voice sounds very loud and severe
  • strangled: a strangled sound is one that someone stops before they finish making it
  • strangulated: strangled
  • strident: a strident voice or sound is loud and unpleasant
  • taut: used about something such as a voice or expression that shows someone is nervous or angry
  • thick: if your voice is thick with an emotion, it sounds less clear than usual because of the emotion
  • thickly: with a low voice that comes mostly from your throat
  • thin: a thin voice or sound is high and unpleasant to listen to
  • throaty: a throaty sound is low and seems to come from deep in your throat
  • tight: a tight voice or expression shows that you are nervous or annoyed
  • toneless: a toneless voice does not express any emotion
  • tremulous: if something such as your voice or smile is tremulous, it is not steady, for example because you are afraid or excited
  • wheezy: a wheezy noise sounds as if it is made by someone who has difficulty breathing
  • wobbly: if your voice is wobbly, it goes up and down, usually because you are frightened, not confident, or are going to cry